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    Friday
    Apr112014

    Important Choices for Self-Publishing Authors, Part 3

    How to hire self-publishing experts without the costs and problems of using a subsidy publisher. When you hire freelancers they are responsible to you. You maintain control of your book’s production. You decide what kinds of help you need and keep costs down, paying only for what you need, rather than paying for a package of services that you don’t need. Here are some things to keep in mind while hiring.

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    Tuesday
    Apr082014

    Important Choices for Self-Publishing Authors, Part 2

    If you’re a self-publishing author, you have some important choices to make. In this blog series, we are discussing the pros and cons to help you with the most important decisions you’ll need to know about: Is self-publishing as a DIY project? Or should you hire others to help with editing, book design, publishing, distribution, publicity and marketing? Beginning authors see the “self” in self-publishing and think it must be a DIY project; that they have a long learning curve ahead to master every step of the process. That’s not always the case; in fact, almost all experienced self-publishing writers take a team approach.

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    Sunday
    Apr062014

    Important Choices for Self-Publishing Authors, Part 1

    “The indie author insurrection has become a revolution that will strip publishers of power they once took for granted.” - Mark Coker, CEO of Smashwords If you’re a self-publishing author, you have some important choices to make. Here is one of the most important decisions you’ll need to know about: Do you really want to “self-publish,” or should you use a “self-publishing company”?

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    Thursday
    Apr032014

    Planning to Get Good Feedback on the Draft of Your Book

    “It is perfectly okay to write garbage—as long as you edit brilliantly,” advises Hugo Award-winning science fiction writer C. J. Cherryh. One of the keys to transforming a rough edged draft manuscript into a well-edited, polished book is getting quality feedback about what you’ve written. Many writers spend hours planning their draft – creating outlines, plot summaries, and character sketches. Yet those same authors ask for a critique of their draft without any real plan of how to make sure the feedback will be useful. They are disappointed when one reader’s sole comment is, “It was good. I really liked it,” and another does a hatchet job on the text (and its author). Two questions will help you avoid such less than useful results: 1. Who should I ask to read my draft? 2. What specific instructions should I give them on the type of feedback I want?

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    Monday
    Mar312014

    6 Tips on Productivity Tools for Writers

    Writing well is difficult at best. Here are some tools gathered from around the net to help make it easier. Sometimes there’s nothing like having the right tool for the job. I hope you find these useful.

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    Saturday
    Mar292014

    How Did Historical Turning Points Shape Your Ancestors’ Lives?

    Your family has lived through a variety of historical turning points. But if you’re like many genealogists who want to turn their research into a family history, you don’t think about your ancestors in relation to those pivotal moments in history. Here's why you might want to.

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    Wednesday
    Mar262014

    Writing a Great Memoir: Advice from the Masters

    Thousands of people write memoirs every year. How do you make your memoir standout from the crowd? Here’s so advice from masters of the genre on how to make sure yours is a good one.

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    Monday
    Mar242014

    Finding the Story Beyond the Facts in Your Family History

    Novelist Suzanne Berne’s book Missing Lucile: Memories of the Grandmother I Never Knew chronicles her search for meaning in her family’s history. The experience is one that is familiar genealogists and family historians. It might also be a cautionary tale they would be well to examine. At the heart is her grandmother, Lucile, who died of cancer in her early forties. However, her father, a very young boy at the time, always believed that his mother had abandoned him. He said, “We were told she was gone. No one ever said where.” Berne decided that her missing grandmother was "the Rosetta stone by which all subsequent family guilt and unhappiness could be decoded.” She set out to unlock the family secrets by discovering what she could about Lucile’s story.

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    Thursday
    Mar202014

    Older books, rescued by OCR

    Two of my new clients need me to perform OCR on their books. OCR, you say - is that like CPR? Sort of. OCR, or optical character recognition, can save the life of a book that would otherwise die in this digital age. It allows us to scan hard copies of books, one that are not already on a computer, and to transcribe the text into a word processing program like Microsoft Word. Then the text can be edited and designed just like a modern book.

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    Monday
    Mar172014

    Print is Dead, and Ebooks Rule - Right?

    “Why are you still publishing print books?” a woman at the Tucson Festival of Books asked. “My friends tell me that everything is going to be digital.” That’s a legitimate question; so we had a friendly debate about the relative merits of digital and print books. As you know, at Stories To Tell we design both print and ebooks, but I don’t expect that print is dead or it will ever go out of style. Here are some reasons for a printed book.

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    Saturday
    Mar152014

    Six Marketing Tips to Help You Find an Audience For Your Book

    Today we have a collection of great ideas from around the web to help you market your self-published book.

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    Tuesday
    Mar112014

    Lessons from Michael Connelly - What to Leave Out

    Elmore Leonard said, “I try to leave out the parts that people skip.” That’s easier said than done. Well-written genre novels are often described as “page-turners.” Learning how to build and maintain momentum means choosing what to leave out, because that keeps the readers turning pages. I love a good mystery. Nobody writes them better than Michael Connelly. The Gods of Guilt, the latest in his Michael Haller (The Lincoln Lawyer) series, is a wonderful example of omitting what’s unnecessary to maintain the novel’s pace.

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    Sunday
    Mar092014

    What To Do Before Your Self-Published Book Hits The Market

    600,000 to a million new titles will be published this year, and far fewer than 1% of them will ever find their way onto bookstore shelves. 800,000 books are currently available for Amazon’s Kindle. The upshot? In this crowded marketplace, readers won’t find your book unless you help them. How can you work toward that goal? Even as you’re writing, you can get started on building your audience. Begin early if you can, six to eight months before your book’s publication date, to lay your foundation and build some momentum. Here are some of the steps you can take in advance.

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    Thursday
    Mar062014

    Point of View and Emotions in Writing Family History 

    Point of view is not something family historians are likely think about. After all, you seek to collect “true” stories. Then, when you’re ready to write, you review what you have gathered, and you tell the story - from your own point of view. What’s the downside? The result can be more like a report than a story. Instead, consider switching your point of view around. Look at events from the point of view of the people you are writing about. How did they feel about what was going on in their lives? What were they thinking about as the events you describe unfolded? We know that much of the drama of history comes from decisions they made. So, what would they have considered before deciding to take the action they did?

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    Monday
    Mar032014

    Young Adult Novel Plan Will Make You Laugh - Video

    Writing can be a serious business, but sometimes you just need a laugh. College Humor’s video sketch, Obama’s Young Adult Novel Plan, is guaranteed to give you one. Enjoy!

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