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    Friday
    Jul262013

    Separating Fact From Fiction in Writing Family History

    Family historians are always looking for stories about ancestors. They want to embellish the facts – names, birth, death, dates, marriage, children, and location with tales that bring their progenitors to life. Many rush to interview aging relatives to capture those stories before they are lost. Others bemoan the fact that they didn’t ask about their ancestors before members of the previous generation passed. Some are able to congratulate themselves on having collected the family stories in audio or video recordings. That successful few are confident that they have the benefit of primary sources – accounts by people with direct knowledge of the stories they have told. Primary sources are wonderful, but they come with a caveat. As Ronald Reagan once advised, “Trust, but verify.” The stories passed down by aging family members while interesting and colorful sometimes are less than wholly accurate from a factual standpoint.

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    Tuesday
    Jul232013

    The Breadth and Depth of Your Family History: What Gets Into Your Book?

    Planning a family history book is all about making choices. Having done many years of research and accumulated mountains of information, you may feel a bit overwhelmed when you begin to think about turning it into a book. One of the first realizations most of us have is that research is nearly infinite (You’ll probably continue to research for the rest of your life.) A book, however, is finite, subject to limitations of both physical size and reader interest. You realize that not everything you have learned about your ancestors will fit in a single volume. The question is, “What gets into the book?”

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    Sunday
    Jul212013

    Use Your Personal Network To Publicize Your Self-Published Book

    You sit down to plan how you will market your book. (Last week’s post 7 Things You’ll Need For Your Marketing Plan discussed some things you’ll want to have ready when you do.) It’s likely that one of your first thoughts is that this is a big job, maybe too big for one person. A lot of authors who have never marketed a book think about hiring a publicist or a book marketer to do it for them. That can be expensive. Let’s look instead at how you can tap your personal network to help you create a buzz about your book.

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    Friday
    Jul192013

    5 Tips for Quality Photo Scanning

    One of the great things the digital age has done for book publishing is make it easy than ever before to create an illustrated book. One of the keys to producing a beautiful illustrated book is having high quality images to work with. That means good scanning is essential. Here are five tips to help you make sure you have well scanned images to illustrate your book:

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    Tuesday
    Jul162013

    Avoiding Legal Issues When Writing About Real People

    When you are writing nonfiction, particularly about people who are still living, it’s worth giving some thought to some of the legal issues which might arise. Most questions which arise about the portrayal of a person in nonfiction are based on one of two legal questions: Defamation: A person may claim that the book contains falsehoods that hold the subject up to scorn. Invasion of privacy: Legal expert Howard G. Zaharoff told Writers Digest that a person mentioned in a book has “The right to avoid disclosure of truthful but embarrassing private facts…” The issue here is not the truth of what is reported, but whether it is “not related to public concern.” Both are potential issues. Even when a person portrayed in the book is dead, his family members might claim either defamation or invasion of privacy.

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    Sunday
    Jul142013

    Self-Publishing a Book: 7 Things You’ll Need For Your Marketing Plan

    “All writers think of what they do as an art,” said novelist Barry Eisler. “Smart writers understand that writing is also a business. Really smart writers see themselves also as entrepreneurs.” That means you need to approach your book as a business person would. You have a product to sell – your book. How will you get the maximum number of potential readers to buy it? That will take some thoughtful planning. You’ll need a good marketing plan for your book. Today we’ll focus on seven things you should think about before you formulate your plan. (Creating the plan itself will be next Monday’s post.) Several of the things we’ll cover today are resources you’ll need to create and use as you put your plan into action.

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    Friday
    Jul122013

    Narrative Openings: Getting Nonfiction Off to a Good Start

    Working on a nonfiction book? How will storytelling help you make it one people will want to read? The fact is that most nonfiction writers don’t think of themselves as storytellers. They’re reporters putting together factual commentary on information or events, or maybe analysts investigating problems, ideas, or policies. But storytellers, not no so much. That’s too bad because a writer, whether producing a novel or a work of nonfiction faces the same challenge of grabbing a reader’s attention and keeping him engaged. Plunging the reader into a story works well for a novelist, but it may work equally well for a nonfiction writer. Let’s take a look at how two gifted nonfiction writers use a narrative open to hook their readers attention and draw them into the topic they will then explore.

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    Wednesday
    Jul102013

    Reading or Writing a Book Helps Avoid Memory Loss

    We just discovered another reason to love reading and writing. The American Academy of Neurology just released a statement which says, “New research suggests that reading books, writing and participating in brain-stimulating activities at any age may preserve memory.” Wow! That’s big, especially when you realize that the National Council on Aging reports that 42% of older Americans are very or somewhat worried about memory loss.

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    Wednesday
    Jul032013

    You’ve Written the Draft of Your Book: Good! Now Revise It

    You have finished the first draft of your book. Congratulations! Celebrate your accomplishment, but realize that you are at a critical crossroads in your book’s development. Experienced writers realize that their manuscript has a long way to go before it's ready for print. Inexperienced writers often don’t. They are “finished” writing and believe their book needs only a quick copy edit to get the commas in the right place before it will be headed top spot on Amazon. That’s too bad because their book will probably fall far short of what it could have been. Inexperienced writers haven’t yet learned the iterative nature of their craft. A good finished product requires iterations of writing and revision. Revising well is an essential step in producing a quality book. Let's look at how to do it well.

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    Sunday
    Jun302013

    Photos & Illustrations for a Family History Book: Sources and Choices

    Digital printing has dramatically changed the look of family history books. Twenty years ago family history books were almost exclusively text, either prose written by their authors or charts and documents they had collected. Digital printing has made it possible to include photos and illustrations of all kinds and to do so in full color at a reasonable price. When you look at a newly published family history it is almost always an illustrated book. Creating illustrated books has raised some new issues for family historians. The most important are: Choosing which illustrations to include Finding quality images for those illustrations Let’s look at some ways to deal with both questions.

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    Thursday
    Jun272013

    Your Family History – Pass It On!

    You’ve traced your lineage back ten generations. You know who came over on the Mayflower, or crossed the Middle Passage on a slaver, or came steerage to Ellis Island. You have all the details documented to the highest possible level of proof. How do you pass the product of your years of diligent research on to the next generation? Put it in a book! Think about the people with whom you want to share your knowledge of the family’s history. They are your book’s intended audience. What will they want to know? Think about how you can chronicle the family history in a way that will engage them – even the grandchildren.

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    Tuesday
    Jun252013

    Use a Reunion to Research Your Family History Book

    If you are part of an extended family that gets together for summer reunions, big holiday gatherings, or to commemorate important occasions like 75th birthdays, 50th anniversaries, or retirements, then you are fortunate. These family gatherings are virtual gold mines for the would-be family or personal historian. Bringing together your relatives gives you eyewitness sources who can add information to whatever you are researching. There are some simple things that you can do to make sure that you take maximum advantage of the opportunity your family gathering will present.

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    Sunday
    Jun232013

    Your Self-Published Book Needs a Hook

    Readers have short attention spans and lots of choices. If your book doesn’t pique their interest quickly they’ll put it down and pick up another from the bookstore shelf or click away to another Amazon listing. People writing for the internet understand the problem. BJP Copywriting warns, “From the first moment a customer arrives on your website, the clock is ticking…you’ve got an average of just 7 seconds to grab a reader’s attention and give them the information they want, before they leave your site.” Potential reader may give your book a few seconds longer, but you need to have a sense of urgency about grabbing their attention. Charles Dickens could get away with beginning David Copperfield with, “I am born,” when it was published in 1849, but you can’t. Whether you are writing fiction or non-fiction, your book needs a hook.

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    Friday
    Jun212013

    Engaging Readers: Narrative vs. Narrative Summary

    Mark Twain once observed, “The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and a lightning bug.” Writers would be well advised to understand that narrative and narrative summary present a similar problem.

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    Tuesday
    Jun182013

    Surprise! Bookstores Are Attracting More Readers

    Bookstores are disappearing for two: they can compete with Amazon.com, and print books are being replaced by ebooks. These two threads are part of almost any discussion of book publishing and the book business. However, recent trends suggest that both beliefs may be wrong. Kristine Rusch in an excellent post on her blog The Business Rusch, describes The Changing Playing Field. First, she finds that the bookstores, rather than dying are experiencing a resurgence. She cites a recent report in National Real Estate Investor titled Brick and Mortar Book Sellers Gained Shopper Traffic in the First Three Months of 2013 which says: In spite of the intense competition from digital book sellers, bricks-and-mortar bookstores were among the top gaining categories in shopper traffic in the first three months of the year, behind financial planning shops and bars. Bookstores as a group experienced a 27 percent increase in shopper visits during the period and moved up six spots in Placed Insights’ ranking, to number 46. Barnes & Noble in particular moved up eight spots on the list of the most visited stores in the U.S., to number 17.

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