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    Tuesday
    Nov262013

    Publishing a Book? 10 Tips on How to Sell It

    You have probably seen every marketing, promotional and sales trick in the book in the run up to Black Friday and Cyber Monday. As an author, particular a self-publishing author, you may be asking yourself, how can I make my campaign to sell my book stand out in the blizzard of marketing messages? Here are ten great tips from around the web to help you do just that.

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    Sunday
    Nov242013

    John Sargent, CEO of Macmillian Publishing on Making Decisions

    How do you make critical decisions? John Sargent, CEO of Macmillan Publishers, presented his answer in an inspirational TED Talk in New York City last week. He focuses on making critical choices when the outcome is unknowable, as Sargent out it, on “…making decisions that you don’t have historical context and you don’t have information that is useful in making the decision.” Ultimately, says Sargent, you must decide whether you will experience the unknown, or whether risk is too great. He frames the talk with his own decision to join other major publishers in working with Apple to create the iBookstore for ebooks.

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    Wednesday
    Nov202013

    What I Learned from Speaking at a Writer's Conference

    We are happy to host today's guest post by author, creativity coach and commedian Bryan Cohen who is stopping by as part of the blog tour for his new book, 1,000 Creative Writing Prompts, Volume 2: More Ideas for Blogs, Scripts, Stories and More. Welcome Bryan! The invitation came through my freelance writing website. So many emails from that site are spam, it would've been easy to miss. The message came from North Wildwood, New Jersey. I'd never been there, but my upbringing in suburban Philadelphia gave me a vague understanding of the Jersey Shore's geography. Carolyn, the co-leader of the conference, had read through my work and extended an invitation to speak at the North Wildwood Beach Writer's Conference that June.

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    Tuesday
    Nov192013

    There’s More to the Story – AP Stories and Family History

    Many biographers, stuck for a more clever title, have simply called their books The Life and Times of [their subject here]. It’s not terribly creative, but it does convey an important idea for every biographer or family historian to remember: every life comes with a historical context. A person’s life story is shaped by the time and place in which he or she lived. What social, cultural, technological and political forces might have had an impact upon the subject of your research? For family historians exploring those larger forces can seem like a huge endeavor tacked onto canvasing family and vital records to gather the essential facts about a family member. That task just got a lot easier. The Associated Press and Ancestry.com have announced a partnership that will make more than one million stories from the AP newswire available in a searchable database.

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    Sunday
    Nov172013

    Write a Memoir or Family History People Will Want to Read

    If you plan to write about a person’s life – yours in a memoir or a family member’s in a family history – think about your audience before you begin. Why will anyone want to read the life story you have written? Few people are looking for a simple factual account of events, although attention to getting the facts right is essential, as James Frey learned when he fabricated his memoir A Million Little Pieces. Readers are interested in insight and understanding. A memoir or family history may start in individual experience, but it should go beyond the purely personal space to suggest insights and understandings readers can apply to their own lives. Consider the most widely read memoir and family history of the last 50 years: Frank McCourt’s Angela’s Ashes published in 1996 and Alex Haley’s fictionalized 1976 account of his family history Roots.

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    Friday
    Nov152013

    Self-Publishing a Book: Should You Design It Yourself?

    You have finished the manuscript for your book? It has been thoroughly edited and you are ready to move ahead with self-publishing? At this point you may ask yourself, should I design the book myself? One aspect of the question is the complexity of your book. If your book has extensive graphics, photographs or illustrations, or is heavily formatted the design issues are more complex than for a simpler text only book like a novel. But, even with novels professional book designers employ the tools of the Adobe Creative Suite: Photoshop, Illustrator, Bridge and InDesign to achieve a professional look. Are these tools part of your skill set? Let’s consider some of the reasons for using a professional book designer.

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    Wednesday
    Nov132013

    Create a Good Reader Experience With Your Nonfiction Book

    If you spend any time in the tech world you have no doubt bumped into discussions about the importance of the user experience. If you are writing a nonfiction book you would benefit from some similar thinking about the kind of reader experience your book will produce. Begin by thinking about the audience you want to reach.

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    Monday
    Nov112013

    A Veterans Day Goal - Preserve Your Veteran's Story

    Veterans Day is the day Americans officially honor the service of our military veterans. What better way is there to honor them than to preserve the stories of their service? That preservation can take a variety of forms. The Library of Congress Veterans History Project at the American Folklife Center is preserving oral history interviews with veterans. The project website provides specifics on how you can participate and offers guides to the interview process. A quick web search of veterans’ history” will provide listings for many state and local veterans history projects which support the work being done at the Library of Congress. Books make a great preservation tool.

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    Friday
    Nov082013

    There’s a Song for Everything. Should You Use Its Lyrics in Your Book?

    Music provides the sound track for our lives. Nancy often says, “There’s a song for everything,” and quotes a lyric. It’s no wonder that writers seeking to create a mood or capture a moment in time should be tempted to do the same thing. But when you are tempted to quote a song lyric in your book, think twice.

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    Wednesday
    Nov062013

    Transform Your Family History Book from a Dream to a Specific Goal

    The first step in the process of actually creating the family history book you keep saying you will write someday is to transform it from a dream to a specific goal on your to do list. Genealogical research is infinite. There’s always more to do. As long as you’re focused on research your book remains a dream. A book is finite. It requires specific actions to make it a reality. The first step is to set a target date for completion. “I’ll have my book written by _____.” Once you have established a target date, you can plan backward from that date to set sub-goals which will lead you to completion of the book.

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    Sunday
    Nov032013

    Letters and Diaries: A Family Historian’s Windows into His Ancestor’s World

    To construct a narrative family history one must gather the family lore and stories to supplement the facts drawn from vital records. Unfortunately, as most family historians know too well the people we would like to ask about those stories are often no longer with us. When that’s the case, you need to reconstruct your family’s narrative from the limited records available. Letters and diaries can be a rich source of family stories. Even a single letter can be a wonderful tool in understanding an ancestors time and place. Letters and diaries are part of the cultural conversation of the times in which they were written. The topics they address are those which were important not only to their authors, but to their contemporaries. These personal writings can help us to understand both our ancestors’ connection to their times and their the unique way they experienced those times.

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    Thursday
    Oct312013

    Your Family History Didn't Happen in a Vacuum

    “I just don’t have a lot of family stories,” say far too many genealogists who want to write a family history. I understand. Everyone always wishes they had taken the time to gather family stories when they had a chance. There are plenty of questions you wish you’d asked Grandfather Harry or Great Aunt Sue, who was the family busybody and knew everybody’s story. But the opportunity to sit down with them with a notebook and pen or even better a tape recorder has come and gone. But that doesn’t your family history is doomed to be a dutiful recounting of facts recalled from your genealogical research and pages of pedigree charts. You can make your book lively and interesting. All it takes is a little perspective.

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    Saturday
    Oct262013

    Use ARCs to Create a Buzz Before You Launch Your Book

    Advance Reader Copies (ARCs) are a routine part of a traditional publisher’s process for launching a book. The should be something you use in getting your self-published book off to a good start as well. The idea of an ARC is to get a copy of your book into the hands of opinion makers – reviewers, media contacts, influencers – prior to the launch of your book. These readers can help create a buzz about your book as it is becoming available.

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    Wednesday
    Oct232013

    Family History Books: Preserving the Past to Benefit the Future

    Most family historians have probably never heard of Leopold Von Ranke, but he’s largely responsible for many of the methods they use in studying their family’s history. Von Ranke, a great German historian of the 19th Century is generally regarded as the founder of the empirical school of source based history. He believed that we should use primary sources to learn "how things actually were." Family historians have happily embraced the search for documentary evidence about their ancestors. Unfortunately there’s another element of the historical method Von Ranke suggested which is much less rigorously applied by genealogists and family historians. That involves the purpose of research. He said, "To history has been assigned the office of judging the past, of instructing the present for the benefit of future ages.” The task of instructing can only be accomplished when the historian constructs a historical narrative from the information she has gathered through her research. In short, you have to tell the story of your ancestors if anyone is to learn from your research. How do you plan to do that?

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    Sunday
    Oct202013

    Best Business, Promotion and Marketing Tips for Writers

    Today we are offering a collection of tips, ideas and tools to help create a buzz about your book and keep up with new developments in the business of writing and publishing. Follow the links to the latest business news for writers from top sources around the web.

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