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    Wednesday
    Dec192012

    Does Some of Your Book Belong on the Cutting Room Floor?

    I love newspapers, especially the Sunday editions, because you never know what interesting idea or insight you might come across. This weekend San Francisco Chronicle film critic Mick La Salle responded to a reader’s question in an exchange in Sunday Chron: Q: Why are so many movies so long these days? A: Very few movies need to be longer than two hours. Directors should make movies, not take hostages. There’s an important lesson for writers in La Salle’s comment. Most first drafts have a lot in them that doesn’t need to be there.

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    Sunday
    Dec162012

    Self-Publishing to Find a Traditional Book Deal

    The conventional route to a book deal is being challenged by a new path into print with a traditional publisher. It’s easy to dismiss Amanda Hocking’s $2 million contract with St. Martin’s Press and E.L. James’ seven-figure deal with Vintage Books as outliers. A closer look will indicate that they are simply the largest and best-known examples of important changes in world of publishing...There’s a new reality. While finding an agent who can successfully place your book with a traditional house is growing increasingly difficult, publishing houses are looking to successful self-published books as a new source of titles.

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    Thursday
    Dec132012

    Never Underestimate the Importance of a Great Book Cover

    How can you tell the difference between a Saturday night B-movie on the SiFi Channel and a Hollywood blockbuster like Ridley Scott’s Prometheus? Simple. Production values. The blockbuster has the budget and the special effects wizards to create a world that appears real and plausible. We are drawn into it. The B-movie creates a world that might have provoked us to say, “Man, that’s fakey!” when we were kids at a matinee. It distances us from whatever merit the script might have. Keep that in mind when it comes time to self-publish your book.

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    Tuesday
    Dec112012

    Lee Child Tells How to Grab & Hold a Reader’s Attention

    How do you grab your reader’s attention with the first chapter and hold onto it all the way through your book? Thriller writer Lee Child offered a method in the New York Times Sunday Review this week with an article titled A Simple Way to Create Suspense. “As novelists, we should ask or imply a question at the beginning of the story, and then we should delay the answer,” said Child. Let’s look at two of my favorite classic movies to see how it works.

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    Sunday
    Dec092012

    Guy Kawasaki Tells Self-Publishers How to Publish a Book

    In 2011 Guy Kawasaki wrote the best-selling book Enchantment. A large technology company wanted to buy five hundred copies of the ebook version, but the book’s publisher, Penguin, was not able to fulfill the order. So Kawasaki decided to become a self-publishing author with his next book, What the Plus? about Google+. In the process of doing that he learned that for a newbie “…self-publishing is a mystifying, frustrating, and inefficient task.” So he partnered with app developer Shawn Welch who could fill in some technical expertise. Together the two acquired a lot of knowledge of how to navigate this new publishing universe and wrote about it in APE: How to Publish a Book, which they also self-published. Kawasaki’s goal for the book is simple. “I want to create the Chicago Style Manual of Self-Publishing,” he says.

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    Thursday
    Dec062012

    Memoir: The Third Level of Life Story Writing

    When you set out to write a memoir, keep in mind that your readers’ first question will be, “What’s in it for me?” One of the problems I see among people who set out to write a memoir is that they don’t understand that there are different levels on which they might write about their life.

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    Tuesday
    Dec042012

    4 Ways to Overcome Winter Blues and Get More Writing Done

    As the skies get grayer and the daylight hours shorter, do you find yourself growing less productive? I know I do, and a surprising number of people I talk to say they do too. So today, let’s see what we can do to turn that slide around with some ideas to help you get energized and get more writing done. First, the change in how we’re feeling really is physical as well as psychological. Whether you call what you are feeling “winter blues’ or go for a more scientific cachet with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) there is plenty of research on the subject. But, let’s focus about what to do about it.

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    Sunday
    Dec022012

    Changes in Publishing: Anything in Them for Authors?

    On October 29, the NY Times reported that, “The book publishing industry is starting to get smaller in order to get stronger.” Two of the giants Penguin owned by Pearson PLC and Random House owned by Bertelsmann had merged in a move that “…will create the largest consumer book publisher in the world, with a global market share of more than 25 percent…” The merger followed a July move by Penguin into the lucrative self-publishing market when it purchased the dominant provider in that market, Author Solutions. At the time, Author Solutions CEO Kevin Weiss said, “That means more opportunity for authors and more choice for readers.” We were, and remain skeptical. The reasons are outlined in our post Writers Beware: Penguin Buys Author Solutions. We were equally skeptical last week when the NY Times reported that Simon and Schuster another of the big-6 (now big 5) publishing houses had signed an agreement with Penguin and Author Solutions to form a self-publishing imprint Archway Publishing.

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    Friday
    Nov302012

    How Your Book's Audience Should Shape Its Content

    Who is your audience? How should that shape your writing? Too many nonfiction writers think of neither of these questions as they draft their books. Their focus is strictly on what they want to say. The result may be that when their books are completed they fail to connect with readers. Let’s take a look at how thinking about a books audience might influence the type of book an writer might create.

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    Wednesday
    Nov282012

    A Plot Is Just a Plot: Great Characters Make a Great Story

    What makes a book memorable? I think we’d all agree that great characters make great fiction. Unfortunately many writers forget that truism when they are writing what they see as a plot-driven story. I have been reading a number of such manuscripts lately. Usually they are genre fiction – mysteries, thrillers, action adventure and alternate history, but it happens in memoir as well. The authors are caught up in the intricate events of their plot. You can almost hear them asking themselves, “What happened next?”after each plot twist. Often they come up with interesting answers to the question. But when they are finished their story is unsatisfying. The reason is usually the same.

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    Monday
    Nov262012

    Must Self-Publishing Authors Be Jacks-of-All-Trades?

    People used to be specialists. But the digital age is making jacks-of-all-trades of more of us every day. The transition isn’t always a smooth one. Nowhere is this more evident than the world of publishing. With the explosion of self-publishing and ebooks more people every day are churning out DIY books. That’s great because it has opened up opportunities to get their work out there. It’s also bad because a lot of the books people produce are not ready to be out there. The reason is that many of the authors who hear the term self-publishing and immediately interpret it to mean that they will complete each step in the process of creating a book themselves. That’s a fundamental misunderstanding of the self-publishing process.

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    Friday
    Nov232012

    Join in The National Day of Listening

    Today is the National Day of Listening. Launched by Story Corps, a national nonprofit organization modeled after the Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration of the 1930s, in 2008, the National Day of Listening is oral history at the grassroots level. StoryCorps describes the day as, “a day to honor a loved one through listening. It's the least expensive but most meaningful gift you can give this holiday season. You can choose to record a story with anyone you know. This year, StoryCorps has chosen to feature the stories of veterans, active duty military, and their families.” We encourage you to participate. (See our recent blog post A Veterans Day Goal – Preserve Your Veterans Story.)

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    Tuesday
    Nov202012

    When You're Ready to Start Your Book

    Here’s one for the top-ten of our Frequently Asked Questions: How do I get started writing a book? First, let’s focus on how to get started with a non-fiction book. (Fiction is a question for another blog.) Consider your reason for writing a non-fiction book. It may be that you have extensive, perhaps professional experience, you’ve acquired a lot of knowledge and insight about a subject, and now you want to share it. How should you share it? There are choices. Do you prefer to be an instructor, to offer advice in a how-to book?

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    Saturday
    Nov172012

    Self-Publishing Horror Stories

     

    We are getting ready for Day 2 of the Miami Book Fair International today. 
    If there was one theme we encountered on the first day of this multi-block street fair in downtown Miami, it was: self-publishing author beware.
    We met a lot of wonderful authors at our Stories To Tell booth. They were enthusiastic about the books they wanted to create. But, too many of them were smarting from their experiences with subsidy publishers with their previous books. They had purchased publishing packages from companies including Author House, XLibris, iUniverse, Outskirts Press, and Publish America. 
    Their complaints covered a range of issues.
    Two women, one a professional editor, who co-wrote an award-winning book, complained about the great difficulty they had communicating with the editor assigned to their book. The company had clearly outsourced the project overseas. The editor spoke with a heavy accent and was difficult to understand. The authors requested another editor, but the request went nowhere.
    Another woman described months of complaints about the interior design of her book. The company said her book was ready, but the text fonts, bold and italics were not what she had written in her manuscript. She had to reject the design and demand that it be corrected several times. Each time the company was resistant.
    Several authors we spoke with felt they had been misled when they paid for marketing packages. All agreed that the services provided were inadequate. Indeed the authors found that  all they got were Amazon listings they could had arranged for themselves at no cost. Each author reported that the publisher's marketing was inadequate and they had to do their own marketing to succeed. 
    Another author told us about the way her publishing company had set the cover price of her book at a level which was too high for her to make a profit. She had requested a change in the price, but was unsuccessful. Now, two years later, she could buy out her contract with the company and republish it herself. To add insult to injury, the company charged her an additional $100 for the use of the cover design which she had already paid for.
    Other authors told us that they could not get the rights to their books back from the companies. They had simply resigned themselves to moving on to a second book.
    It’s a shame! A quick web search for self-publishing will return listings for all of these large corporations. Authors, seeing no alternative, sign up for a publishing package which often includes services they don’t need at inflated prices, and it all turns out badly.
    These sadder, but wiser authors are all enthusiastic about their next books because they intend to truly self-publish. They will maintain all the rights to their book by managing the process themselves, hiring professional editors and book designers to create the book. They expect to take responsibility for their own marketing but they can set the price of the book, and keep all the profits! That's how self publishing should work. 

    We are getting ready for Day 2 of the Miami Book Fair International today. If there was one theme we encountered on the first day of this multi-block street fair in downtown Miami, it was: self-publishing author beware.We met a lot of wonderful authors at our Stories To Tell booth. They were enthusiastic about the books they wanted to create. But, too many of them were smarting from their experiences with subsidy publishers with their previous books. They had purchased publishing packages from companies including Author House, XLibris, iUniverse, Outskirts Press, and Publish America. Their complaints covered a range of issues.Two women, one a professional editor, who co-wrote an award-winning book, complained about the great difficulty they had communicating with the editor assigned to their book. The company had clearly outsourced the project overseas. The editor spoke with a heavy accent and was difficult to understand. The authors requested another editor, but the request went nowhere.Another woman described months of complaints about the interior design of her book. The company said her book was ready, but the text fonts, bold and italics were not what she had written in her manuscript. She had to reject the design and demand that it be corrected several times. Each time the company was resistant.Several authors we spoke with felt they had been misled when they paid for marketing packages. All agreed that the services provided were inadequate. Indeed the authors found that  all they got were Amazon listings they could had arranged for themselves at no cost. Each author reported that the publisher's marketing was inadequate and they had to do their own marketing to succeed. Another author told us about the way her publishing company had set the cover price of her book at a level which was too high for her to make a profit. She had requested a change in the price, but was unsuccessful. Now, two years later, she could buy out her contract with the company and republish it herself. To add insult to injury, the company charged her an additional $100 for the use of the cover design which she had already paid for.Other authors told us that they could not get the rights to their books back from the companies. They had simply resigned themselves to moving on to a second book.It’s a shame! A quick web search for self-publishing will return listings for all of these large corporations. Authors, seeing no alternative, sign up for a publishing package which often includes services they don’t need at inflated prices, and it all turns out badly.These sadder, but wiser authors are all enthusiastic about their next books because they intend to truly self-publish. They will maintain all the rights to their book by managing the process themselves, hiring professional editors and book designers to create the book. They expect to take responsibility for their own marketing but they can set the price of the book, and keep all the profits! That's how self publishing should work. 

     

    Tuesday
    Nov132012

    Video: Use Google Image Search to Find Quality Images for Your Book

    Finding high quality illustrations for your book can be a real challenge. Many of the images on the internet are low resolution which will not work well for book printing. This video, the first on our new Stories To Tell Books YouTube Channel, will show you how to solve the problem. This tutorial takes you through the process of using Google Image Search to locate better, higher resolution images to replace low-quality photos in your collection. Nancy Barnes explains how to locate better, higher resolution duplicates of your images to meet the requirements for commercial book printing. These methods work for all photo searches in Google Images, but they are especially helpful for people who wish to upgrade an existing photo. Learn how to use advanced settings to locate images by size, by type, and for free use, as well as sorting them by usage rights, so that you can publish the photos in your commercial book without violating copyrights.

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