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    Tuesday
    Feb052013

    Writing a Nonfiction Book: Lessons from Tom Wolfe

    If you’re looking for a way to tell your story whether it’s fiction or nonfiction you’d be well advised to look at the lessons offered by Tom Wolfe. His nonfiction, which reached its apogee in The Right Stuff, was a prototype for the so-called “new journalism.” His sharp reporter’s eye worked just as well when he began turning out novels like Bonfire of the Vanities and A Man in Full. In his New York Times review of Wolfe’s new novel Back to Blood, novelist Thomas Mallon wrote: Tom Wolfe’s move from the New Journalism to fiction writing, undertaken a quarter-century ago, now seems on a par with Babe Ruth’s shift from the pitcher’s mound to the regular batting order. But from genre to genre, the fundamentals of Wolfe’s game have stayed the same… Let’s look today at the time before Wolfe made the shift from the mound to the batting order, the days when he was changing the way true stories were reported. There are some key lessons there for anyone who wants to write good nonfiction.

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    Sunday
    Feb032013

    Self-Publishing a Book: Choosing an Editor

    You are finished, or almost finished with the manuscript for your book. You have revised it diligently and asked friends and family to act as beta-readers. You are happy with what you have, but you understand why people like Ricky Pittman of Writers Weekly say, ““Every writer has blind spots to his or her own writing.” You know that when Jerry Simmons of Readers and Writers says, “Having an objective, experienced eye to evaluate and edit your work is worth its weight in gold,” he’s right. You want to find a good editor for your book. How do you know when a person is the right editor for you? Here are five questions that will help you decide.

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    Thursday
    Jan312013

    Self-Publish a Book: What Does It Cost?

    How much does it cost to self-publish a book? That’s a simple straightforward question. Unfortunately, the answer is not nearly as simple. Let’s take a look at the reasons.

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    Tuesday
    Jan292013

    Self-Publishing a Book: Two Marketing Lessons from the Super Bowl

    This Sunday’s a big day in living rooms across American. The San Francisco 49ers will square off with the Baltimore Ravens in the Super Bowl Okay self-publishing writers pull up a chair in front of the TV. The San Francisco 49ers and the Baltimore Ravens are about to square off in Super Bowl XLVII. You should be watching. No, not the game! The marketing. The Retail Advertising and Marketing Association estimates that 179 million football fans will it tune in to the big game. “The average game watcher will spend $68.54 on new televisions for viewing parties, snacks, décor and athletic apparel…” There are lessons there for authors.

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    Sunday
    Jan272013

    Writing a Memoir: Unless You’re a Celebrity, It’s Not All About You

    Aging rock stars, sports heroes, entertainment icons and politicians can get away with simply telling occasionally sanitized stories of their lives in their memoirs. Our celebrity-obsessed culture laps them up. That won’t work for the rest of us. The reading audience wants more. Vivian Gornick in The Situation and the Story, put it well when she wrote, “Truth in a memoir is achieved not through a recital of actual events; it is achieved when the reader comes to believe that the writer is working hard to engage with the experience at hand. What happened to the writer is not what matters; what matters is the large sense the writer is able to make of what happened.”

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    Thursday
    Jan242013

    Publish Your Family History Book: Paper or eBook?

    Should you publish your family history as a print book or an ebook? The first place to look for an answer is your audience? How do they prefer to read books? Their preferences should guide your decision on the form your book should take. But they are not the only consideration. What are your goals for your family history? In most cases, preservation is a high priority.

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    Monday
    Jan212013

    Writing A Nonfiction Book Without an Outline: Working Without a Net!

    Did you hate it when they taught outlining in school? The teacher went on and on about where the Roman numerals went and whether this line should have a capital letter, a lower case letter or an Arabic number. I hated it. I think a lot of other people did too. I was speaking to a group of people this weekend who were in the process of writing family history books. I asked how many had an outline for their book. Only about a third did. Too bad! What they were doing was letting straight chronology lock them into the way they told their story. More importantly, by being guided solely by chronology they were risking taking only a superficial look at the events they were describing. Deeper insights that reflection on those events might have produced went by the boards. The result was almost sure to be strictly reportorial rather than dramatic. Developing a good outline (not the one you learned in school, but a well thought out plan of major topics and subpoints) before you begin to write allows you to discover ways to engage your readers that aren’t immediately apparent when looking at the facts you know. Experimenting with different ways of telling your story can help you to discover new insights into what happened and to show them to your audience in a more interesting way than a plodding chronology can ever do. Let’s look at some.

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    Friday
    Jan182013

    Write a Family History Book: Put People’s Lives in Context

    If you are doing genealogical research, you’re a bit like a geologist searching for precious metals. You’re drilling back into the past looking for connections among generations of ancestors over time. The bore hole is deep, but narrow. When you write a family history book that focus on people connected by blood is only part of the story. A family historian seeks not only to establish such kinship connections but to relate ancestors to contemporaries beyond the family. The result connects your ancestors to the times and places in which they lived as well as to each other. Your family history puts the lives of the people in your pedigree chart or family group sheet into a historical context.

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    Tuesday
    Jan152013

    Arizona Family History Expo: Let's Talk About Your Book!

    We’re looking forward to the Arizona Family History Expo which begins Friday in Mesa. One of the things we enjoy is that the participants come ready to learn. Many come equipped with questions they want answered before the expo ends on Saturday. If you have attended a few genealogy conferences you know that the questions people thinking about writing or already working on a family history book will ask usually follow a predictable pattern. Here are five we are sure we’ll here more than once.

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    Sunday
    Jan132013

    How to Write & Publish a Family History Book

    You’ve been thinking about creating a memoir or family history book. But you may feel a like you’d be setting off on a bit of an uncharted course. Creating a book may seem like an overwhelming task. Understanding the six steps every book goes through on its way to print will give you a roadmap which will make successfully seeing your book through to publication much less daunting.

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    Thursday
    Jan102013

    Turn Your Genealogy into a Family History Book

    What will you leave behind after a lifetime of genealogical research? It’s a question that a lot of people ask themselves as they accumulate more and more information about their ancestors. It often leads people to think about ways to pass on their growing knowledge of the family history. There are many methods including creating a databases, creating a family archive, maintaining a family history blog, or a Facebook page. But creating a family history book remains the option of choice for a large number of people.

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    Tuesday
    Jan082013

    Self-Publishing a Book: New Roles for a Writer

    Getting books from the desk of writers to the hands of readers has always been a three step process: • Writing • Creating the book: editing, laying out the interior, designing the cover, and printing • Distributing, Promoting and Marketing Traditionally, writers have been involved in only one of those phases. Creating the book, distribution, promotion and marketing were responsibilities turned over to the traditional publisher. Beyond finding an agent and signing a contract with the publisher, the author didn’t have to worry about the business aspects of the book trade. Self-publishing changes that. A self-publishing author is an independent publisher who is responsible for all three stages of the process. A successful indie author must become a project manager who understands each step of the process and makes sure that the requirements of each are carried out well. Let’s look at what that means.

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    Sunday
    Jan062013

    The Pros and Cons of Self-Publishing Your Book

    You should self-publish your book! We said so in our first post of this year, Publishing a Book in 2013? Self-Publish It! But we think you should do it knowing what your will be getting into. What are your options and why should you choose self-publishing? In our last post we explored The Advantages and Disadvantages of Traditional Publishing. Today, we’ll do the same thing with self-publishing. Then, on Tuesday in the final post of the series, we’ll discuss the best ways to take advantage of the opportunities and avoid the pitfalls self-publishing presents for authors.

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    Thursday
    Jan032013

    Advantages and Disadvantages of Traditional Publishing

    Planning on publishing a book in 2013? In our initial post of 2013 we advised you to “Self-publish it!” In this post and the two that will follow this we’ll look at the reasons you should do that. Today we will analyze Advantages, Disadvantages and Recent Changes in Traditional Publishing and what those things might mean for authors. Our next post will do the same thing for self-publishing. The third post in the series will look at the emergence of a new role for the self-publishing author. So, let’s get started.

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    Tuesday
    Jan012013

    Publishing a Book in 2013? Self-Publish It!

    Want to publish a book in 2013? Do it yourself! The world of book publishing has changed dramatically since 2000 when Stephen King made his internet novella, The Plant, available on his website for $1 per download. ...So, as we begin 2013, best-selling author Guy Kawasaki, in his book APE: How to Publish a Book, advises, “The advantages of self-publishing far outweigh the disadvantages for most authors.”

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